The Boys in the Boat and the O-Ring Theory of Development

boys-in-the-boatI can’t keep track of the number of times I’ve done a post just to point at one of Phil Windley’s posts. But there’s a good reason: Phil’s a highly discriminating thinker and writer who hits some nails right on the head.

This particular nail is Phil recommending a 20 minute video on the O-Ring Theory of Production. It’s one of those great explanations of something you may have intuitively sensed before—that great teams can produce results dramatically better than teams only slightly less capable—but now can understand with startling clarity.

As society and technology grows increasingly complex, the O-Ring Theory of Production has important implications. I certainly know it mirrors my own experience of technical teams.

As I read it, I had one more revelation of where it applies: eight-oar crew teams. For a spellbindingly good example, I can’t recommend The Boys in the Boat highly enough. Yes, I’m biased: it’s set in Seattle and features the 1936 University of Washington crew team. But it’s a universal story that is not just true but so superbly wrought than I predict it will make an award-winning film as well (hopefully soon—the Weinstein Company acquired the film rights in 2011).

Advertisements

About Drummond Reed

Internet entrepreneur in identity, personal data, and trust frameworks
This entry was posted in books, General, Movies. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s